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<div style="float: left; margin: 0.5em 0.9em 0.4em 0em;">[[File:Tab4 Wholey FrontPubHealth2019 6.jpg|240px]]</div>
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'''"[[Journal:National and transnational security implications of asymmetric access to and use of biological data|National and transnational security implications of asymmetric access to and use of biological data]]"'''
'''"[[Journal:Developing workforce capacity in public health informatics: Core competencies and curriculum design|Developing workforce capacity in public health informatics: Core competencies and curriculum design]]"'''
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We describe a master’s level [[public health informatics]] (PHI) curriculum to support workforce development. Public health decision-making requires intensive [[information management]] to organize responses to health threats and develop effective health education and promotion. PHI competencies prepare the public health workforce to design and implement these information systems. The objective for a master's and certificate in PHI is to prepare public health informaticians with the competencies to work collaboratively with colleagues in public health and other health professions to design and develop information systems that support population health improvement. The PHI competencies are drawn from computer, information, and organizational sciences. A curriculum is proposed to deliver the competencies, and the results of a pilot PHI program are presented. Since the public health workforce needs to use information technology effectively to improve population health, it is essential for public health academic institutions to develop and implement PHI workforce training programs. ('''[[Journal:Developing workforce capacity in public health informatics: Core competencies and curriculum design|Full article...]]''')<br />
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Biology and [[biotechnology]] have changed dramatically during the past 20 years, in part because of increases in computational capabilities and use of engineering principles to study biology. The advances in supercomputing, data storage capacity, and [[Cloud computing|cloud platforms]] enable scientists throughout the world to generate, analyze, share, and store vast amounts of data, some of which are biological and much of which may be used to understand the human condition, agricultural systems, evolution, and environmental ecosystems. These advances and applications have enabled: (1) the emergence of data science, which involves the development of new algorithms to analyze and [[Data visualization|visualize data]]; and (2) the use of engineering approaches to manipulate or create new biological organisms that have specific functions, such as production of industrial chemical precursors and development of environmental bio-based sensors. Several biological sciences fields harness the capabilities of computer, data, and engineering sciences, including synthetic biology, precision medicine, precision agriculture, and systems biology. These advances and applications are not limited to one country. This capability has economic and physical consequences but is vulnerable to unauthorized intervention. ('''[[Journal:National and transnational security implications of asymmetric access to and use of biological data|Full article...]]''')<br />
 
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Revision as of 17:10, 24 June 2019

"National and transnational security implications of asymmetric access to and use of biological data"

Biology and biotechnology have changed dramatically during the past 20 years, in part because of increases in computational capabilities and use of engineering principles to study biology. The advances in supercomputing, data storage capacity, and cloud platforms enable scientists throughout the world to generate, analyze, share, and store vast amounts of data, some of which are biological and much of which may be used to understand the human condition, agricultural systems, evolution, and environmental ecosystems. These advances and applications have enabled: (1) the emergence of data science, which involves the development of new algorithms to analyze and visualize data; and (2) the use of engineering approaches to manipulate or create new biological organisms that have specific functions, such as production of industrial chemical precursors and development of environmental bio-based sensors. Several biological sciences fields harness the capabilities of computer, data, and engineering sciences, including synthetic biology, precision medicine, precision agriculture, and systems biology. These advances and applications are not limited to one country. This capability has economic and physical consequences but is vulnerable to unauthorized intervention. (Full article...)

Recently featured:

Developing workforce capacity in public health informatics: Core competencies and curriculum design
Assessing cyberbiosecurity vulnerabilities and infrastructure resilience
What is the meaning of sharing: Informing, being informed or information overload?